Tag Archives: Lion and Unicorn Theatre

Tube

Tube

★★★

Lion and Unicorn Theatre

Tube

Tube

Lion and Unicorn Theatre

Reviewed – 29th January 2020

★★★

 

“a clear portrayal of how relationships develop and intensify and the impact people can have on each other”

 

Two strangers on a tube meet and make conversation when the train comes to a sudden stop. A pretty normal scenario, you would think. You sit there for a few minutes and then you’re on your way again. In this story however, the tube stops and doesn’t move again. Rachel (Michaela Carberry) and “The Man” (George Damms) get to know each other over the course of the play. We see their relationship develop as they learn about each other in an intense, out of the ordinary situation.

“The Man” is a musician and Damms skilfully plays the guitar and sings at various points throughout. This is a nice addition and splits up the scenes effectively. Damms acts well and portrays a character who clearly has more to him than meets the eye and some emotional baggage it would have been interesting to find out more about. Carberry as Michaela is engaging to watch and shows good emotional range throughout her character’s ups and downs.

The set leaves quite a bit to the imagination, but a tube carriage is clearly conveyed by two “windows” at the back of the space with authentic signs you would find in a real carriage. The set space is also clearly marked by fluorescent tape, within which all the action takes place. This is an effective touch and could be said to help create the claustrophobic feeling you would experience if stuck inside a tube carriage for a prolonged period of time.

Joe Kerry (writer) has included modern references and relatable circumstances, such as Rachel’s uncertainty in her move to London to kick-start a career, making Tube relevant to audiences today. The two actors have received good direction from Bobby Standley but there is the danger, if sat at the side, that audience members may sometimes miss lines and facial expressions.

Tube is a clear portrayal of how relationships develop and intensify and the impact people can have on each other. In an un-naturalistic scenario, naturalistic themes are explored alongside a range of human emotion. Some scenes feel a bit disjointed, but a few twists and turns as well as music means we are kept engaged for the most part.

 

Reviewed by Emily K Neal

 


Tube

Lion and Unicorn Theatre

 

Last ten shows reviewed at this venue:
Like You Hate Me | ★★★ | April 2019
Mama G’s Story Time Roadshow | ★★★★★ | May 2019
River In The Sky | ★★½ | May 2019
Euan | ★★★★ | July 2019
A Shoddy Detective & The Art Of Deception | ★★ | August 2019
Blue Tights, Red Knickers And An ‘S’ On Her Vest | ★★★ | August 2019
Camp | ★★★ | August 2019
The Death Of Ivan Ilyich | ★★ | August 2019
Up The Bunty! | ★★★ | December 2019
Julius Caesar | ★★½ | January 2020

 

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Julius Caesar

★★½

Lion and Unicorn Theatre

Julius Caesar

Julius Caesar

Lion and Unicorn Theatre

Reviewed – 14th January 2020

★★½

 

“their rendition makes it apparent that you can no more rush the immortal words of Shakespeare than the overthrowing of a tyrannical despot”

 

Theatre company Mad Wolf aim to make Shakespeare ‘exciting, thrilling… and for everyone’ in their new one-act rendition of the playwright’s historical tragedy Julius Caesar.

Set in Rome in 44 BC, Julius Caesar, produced and directed by Gavin Richards, depicts the moral dilemma of the Roman senator Brutus (Matt Penson) over joining the conspiracy led by Cassius (Alex Bird) to murder Julius Caesar (Aimee Kember) to prevent him becoming dictator of Rome. Supported by Casca (Aimee Pollock) and Cinna (Jasmin Keshavarzi), Cassius and Brutus succeed in their goal before being thrust into civil war against one of Caesar’s greatest supporters Mark Antony (Niall Burns) and Caesar’s adopted son, Octavius (Keshavarzi).

The six actors move confidently between 19 different roles using basic costume changes – a new jacket, a dressing gown etc. – to mark out their new character. Bird is standout in his role as Cassius, adopting an uncomfortably wide stare and hunch that perfectly fit the senator’s shady persona. Kember is thoroughly commanding as Caesar but handles Portia’s sensitive moments with her husband Brutus delicately as well. Frustratingly, some nuances in speech and character are lost by the cast’s over tendency to scream their lines at any moment of heightened emotion.

Mad Wolf’s intentions with their condensed production are noble but there is unfortunately more loss than gain. The performance moves at an incredibly fast pace mainly because the waffling speeches and winding metaphors inherent to Shakespeare’s work have been cut from the script. There is little to no time to pause and reflect on the events that have unfolded, and hugely important moments like Caesar’s death go by in a flash. The omission of such drawn out dialogue certainly makes the play more digestible especially to someone who may not otherwise engage with Shakespeare, but it also makes everything far more confusing due to the lack of exposition. Mad Wolf would have perhaps done better to edit or rewrite the script for clarity rather than simply take out huge chunks of text that are integral to the play’s narrative and rhythm.

The back wall of the theatre is covered in Lord Kitchener-style ‘Caesar Wants You’ posters, many of which are illustrated with graffiti declaring ‘Caesar is King!’ Empty sleeping bags, cardboard rubbish and coats litter the edges of the stage which the cast alternate between using as props and, rather oddly, as something to hide under or appear from when exiting or entering a scene respectively. This direction does make the theatre’s simple space more dynamic by not restricting the cast to the one aisle exit but this oftentimes comes across as comical which is rather jarring considering the overall mood of the play.

The debris also presumably represents the hard times which Caesar was able to capitalise on to gain power, but this is never explicitly explained. The senators’ formal attire resembles that of modern-day politicians which suggests that the audience is to interpret some sort of parallel between this tale and contemporary society, though this is not explored either.

The lighting (Lewis Plumb) is good. Notable moments include flashing overhead lights timed with a thunder sound effect to resemble lightning and the slow fade to black except for a spotlight on one of the Caesar posters at the end of the performance.

Mad Wolf’s production of Julius Caesar sets out on a worthy mission to make the Bard of Avon more accessible. Unfortunately, their rendition makes it apparent that you can no more rush the immortal words of Shakespeare than the overthrowing of a tyrannical despot.

 

Reviewed by Flora Doble

 


Julius Caesar

Lion and Unicorn Theatre until 18th January

 

Previously reviewed at this venue:
BackPAGE | ★★½ | February 2019
Like You Hate Me | ★★★ | April 2019
Mama G’s Story Time Roadshow | ★★★★★ | May 2019
River In The Sky | ★★½ | May 2019
Euan | ★★★★ | July 2019
A Shoddy Detective & The Art Of Deception | ★★ | August 2019
Blue Tights, Red Knickers And An ‘S’ On Her Vest | ★★★ | August 2019
Camp | ★★★ | August 2019
The Death Of Ivan Ilyich | ★★ | August 2019
Up The Bunty! | ★★★ | December 2019

 

Click here to see our most recent reviews