Tag Archives: National Youth Theatre

Animal Farm

Animal Farm

★★★★

Royal and Derngate

Animal Farm

Animal Farm

Royal and Derngate, Northampton

Reviewed – 19th May 2021

★★★★

 

“multi-talented young actors tell this compulsive and provocative story”

 

The Royal Theatre in Northampton re-opens with a superb production from the National Youth Theatre REP Company of George Orwell’s fairy tale/allegory adapted for the stage by Tatty Hennessy.

We are introduced to the main players with a recorded voice-over (Will Stewart). Each animal has been clearly well workshopped and is meticulously caricatured. There is no wearing of animal masks, and little crawling on all fours. Base costumes (Jasmine Swan) are adorned with small signifiers: the pigs wear pink gilets; Minty the sheep, a white tutu and woollen bobble hat; the horses, brown leather belts and straps.

The simplicity of the set (Jasmine Swan), a backdrop of hanging plastic strips, allows the flexibility of multiple entrance and exit points and when the light catches their mud and dirt it gives a looming feeling of the abattoir. Generally effective lighting (Zoe Spurr) includes the dramatic landing of a helicopter, sensational backlit scenes to cast warning shadows and the occasional dramatic use of colour.

Director Ed Stambollouian intersperses full ensemble pieces with scenes focusing on individual characters where each animal gets their turn in the limelight. Each animal could carry more of the story, but all animals are not equal. Napoleon (Jack Matthew) is the main man (pig!) – the self-proclaimed leader of the Revolution. His transformation from pig to man-equal is the more impressive as he fights the animalistic urge to slip back squealing into the mud. Squealer (Matilda Rae) is the political spin-doctor, beautifully conniving and deceitful. The carthorse Boxer (Will Atiomo) with his maxim of “I will work harder” shows fine vocal colour and excellent physical movement. Much of the narration falls upon the mare Clover (Adeola Yemitan) who shines in her poignant personal scene.

The full ensemble scenes are rhythmic and physical (choreography by Vicki Igbokwe) with inventive and ingenious uses of buckets and ladders although handling of the latter sometimes appears clumsy in the close confines of the Royal stage. The hip-hop dance scene counting the seven animal commandments particularly stands out and the singing of the anthem Beasts of England (Composer John Elliott, Musical Director Jordan Clarke) would not sound out of place sung from the barricades of another revolutionary stage show. Whilst the initial Revolution seems too easily won, the Battle of the Cowshed is brilliantly portrayed: animals in formation across all angles of the stage defeat the cartoonish Farmer Giles with kick-ass action (Fight Director Enric Fortuño).

The second half does not sustain the dynamisms of the first as the size of the ensemble reduces, but it does include the most unsettling scene of the evening involving the worrying use of metal pails which evoke shades of the Lubyanka and Guantánamo.

The writer hopes in her programme notes that the show will make us angry. We clearly see how the hard work of the proletariat is exploited by the autocracy, how the honesty of the workers’ revolution is betrayed by its leaders. We see the lies and scheming of politicians as they push through their own vanity projects, air brush history, and steal from the populace… But after seeing these multi-talented young actors tell this compulsive and provocative story on stage I came away primarily with a satisfied feeling that such stories are once again being told. The anger can come later.

 

Reviewed by Phillip Money

Photography by Ali Wright

 


Animal Farm

Royal and Derngate, Northampton until 22nd May

 

Reviewed this year by Phillip:
The Money | ★★★ | Online | April 2021

 

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A Midsummer Night’s Dream

★★★★

Criterion Theatre

A Midsummer

A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Criterion Theatre

Reviewed – 10th December 2019

★★★★

 

“If you need a boost, a good laugh and some quality theatre, get yourself along to enjoy this treat of a show.”

 

This production by the National Youth Theatre, in association with Knee High, is delightful. It was lovely to see and hear the energetic and talented young cast speaking Shakespeare as naturally as if they were out with their mates; different accents relished too.

The NYT says in the programme, ‘We are more than a theatre company. We put young people centre stage. We empower young people to be part of something BIGGER. We create amazing shows. We nurture tomorrow’s creatives …We celebrate the individuality and diversity of Britain’s youth in all it’s forms.’ In this production they showcased a wonderful ensemble who brought Shakespeare’s cherished comedy to vibrant life and kept the audience well entertained.

Bottom was played by Jemima Mayala with enormous energy and bubbling humour. She had us all in stitches, and she can really sing too. Ella Dacres gave us a contemporary teenage Puck, mischievous and cool and Bede Hodgkinson was a remarkably strong and mature Oberon, with more humanity in his fairy meddling that is often evident. Helena and Hermia, played by Jamie Foulks and Julia Kass were particularly fun in the famous row in the woods. It worked having a male Helena, and Foulks managed it without a trace of affectation. Billy Hinchliff’s Lysander was so changed by the fairy influence that he became a posturing, hilarious dandy, strutting and puffing out his chest, a bit like a bonobo on heat. It was brilliant. Every cast member, even those with smaller parts, was memorable; Jordan Ford Silver’s Wall and Joseph Payne’s Lion were lovely comedy gems, and Raj Singh made his little ‘moon’ shine brightly.

Director Matt Harrison has allowed his young cast to unleash their naturalness and enjoyment in this ageless text, giving it a contemporary, playful and relatable feel. The abridgement was accomplished by Kate Kennedy without losing any of the essential story or charm of the piece, and bringing it in at ninety minutes. The action is set in Athens on Sea, a playful imagining with a waltzer car, a fish and chip shop and balloons, a perfect setting for the action, which includes some punchy dance numbers, choreographed by Rebecca Cuthbertson and performed with sparkle and pzazz by the ensemble.

This was the first National Youth Theatre production that I have seen, and it won’t be the last. If you need a boost, a good laugh and some quality theatre, get yourself along to enjoy this treat of a show.

 

Reviewed by Katre

Photography by Helen Murray

 


A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Criterion Theatre until 17th January

 

Previously reviewed at this venue:
The Comedy About a Bank Robbery | ★★★★★ | April 2018

 

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