Tag Archives: Alex Holland

Important Art

★★★

VAULT Festival 2020

Important Art

Important Art

Crypt – The Vaults

Reviewed – 16th February 2020

★★★

 

“has potential both in concept and its players”

 

Important Art is the final show in an extensive line-up at the VAULT Festival 2020 from the improvised comedy syndicate Free Association. Packed with a mock showcase of the very best of high culture, Important Art satirises the inaccessible world of art and its clichés.

The show is split into three parts which have varying degrees of success. The first section is some so-called French-prov, that is, improvised ‘sneak peeks’ from a new French film which is performed by Amanda Stauffer and Clemence Billoud almost entirely in French. Graham Dickson (also the turtleneck-clad host for the evening) and Sophie Broido then take to the stage to perform a supposed snippet of a lost play from the famed American playwright Tennessee Williams. The show closes with Alex Holland and Chris Gau attempting to do some serious improv skits.

Dickson is a great host and both the production’s strongest comedian and actor. In his scenes with Broido, who also does well throughout, Dickson jumps between two very different roles with ease, before returning confidently to his hosting role.

Stauffer and Billoud are clearly both very talented but their French comedy will perhaps be lost on certain audiences. With little to no French, one would struggle to keep up with what’s happening on stage, and several rather blank stares from audience members unfortunately confirm this.

Their scenes would have been far more accessible if they had thrown in the odd French phrase or word but spoken in heavily accented English for most of their performance. It is unclear what point they are trying to make with this bit as though conversations about caca suggest that this is unlike a typical pretentious French art film, a pretty high level of understanding is still required to fully enjoy this part of the production.

Dickson and Broido lead the show’s best section, the theme of which is vaguely prompted by two nouns given by the audience. Even those unfamiliar with Williams’ work can understand, appreciate and laugh at the ridiculous tropes of fiction about small town American life. Broido and Dickson also have great chemistry and bounce off each other well.

The final section by Holland and Gau is amusing but their slapstick comedy won’t be for everyone. The duo establish that they are keen to do improv that covers serious topics, but their scenes always descend into physical fighting complete with smashing plates and ripping clothes. The premise is fun but gets old quickly, though the duo does manage to hit a sweet spot in terms of performance length.

The stage is void of any props other than two chairs which are joined by a table for Holland and Gau’s performance, and the music does well to create a feeling of faux sophistication.

Important Art has potential both in concept and its players, but it needs to reassess how it can appeal to and draw in those who may have initially been alienated by the show’s snooty title and borderline elite content.

 

Reviewed by Flora Doble

 

VAULT Festival 2020

 

 

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How to Date a Magical Creature
★★★

VAULT Festival

How to Date a Magical Creature

How to Date a Magical Creature

The Vaults

Reviewed – 23rd February 2019

★★★

 

“By the end of the hour-long performance, the format had become somewhat repetitive”

 

The Vaults as a venue promises a quirky and original viewing experience, while the play fitted perfectly with the venue’s vibe, it slightly missed the mark. Although not quite a laugh a minute, it was funny and quick witted.

Upon entering the space you see a keyboard in the corner of the room, the man on the piano performs gently while a heavy mist rolls in; some of the set is still being placed and you begin to question whether the play has already begun or if the venue staff haven’t noticed the audience enter? This casual approach to the performance continues throughout.

The premise itself is simple, this is a chat show hosted by one Toby Vanilla. The audience provides suggestions for magical creatures and the cast improvise a character based on the name. These can be existing fictional characters or something made up on the spot. In this instance, the show opened with the appearance of a Dalek.

Creating situations to explore, the host guides the improvisation that ensues. While no character particularly stands out, without a very capable actor playing the role of Toby Vanilla, the performance would fall apart. He engages with the audience, holding their attention, allowing the performance to adhere to some kind of structure.

There was no denying that the piece was at times comedic, with moments where the whole audience was in stitches, but it just not consistently funny. By the end of the hour-long performance, the format had become somewhat repetitive.

How to Date a Magical Creature was a mostly enjoyable performance with some very talented comedy actors. However, without some development in its format, it is not a show I would actively seek out again.

 

Reviewed by Gemma Bees

 

Vault Festival 2019

How to Date a Magical Creature

Part of VAULT Festival 2019

 

 

 

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