Tag Archives: Joseph Prestwich

Happily Ever Poofter
★★★★

Above the Stag

Happily Ever Poofter

Happily Ever Poofter

Above the Stag

Reviewed – 2nd July 2019

★★★★

 

“this is a frivolous, fun fairy tale that draws attention to a serious issue in LGBTQ+ representation”

 

We had to wait until 2017 for Disney’s first ever gay character to make it on screen – namely Gaston’s sidekick LeFou in Bill Condon’s ‘Beauty and the Beast’ live action remake. Cyrus Goodman, from Disney Channel’s ‘Andi Mack’, created a stir in February this year for being the first character on a Disney show to say “I’m gay” after coming out in Season Two. And we all can’t wait for Jack Whitehall’s mysterious “openly gay” character in next year’s ‘Jungle Cruise’. Despite all this, we all know Disney has a long way to go for LGBTQ+ representation, and it’s precisely this that comes under fire in Rich Watkins hilariously risqué cabaret show, now doing a run of Edinburgh previews.

This one-man-marathon sees Prince Henry leaving the land of fairy tales and princesses to enter the ‘real world’ and discover what it means to be gay. His fairy godfather shows him the way into the London gay “scene” where he meets an array of charming men (from Bashful to… erm… Sleepy) and finds comfort and community in (you guessed it) Above the Stag. His journey teaches him some crucial lessons. By finding community, he eventually learns how to be himself – even in the hostile, heteronormative landscape of fairy tale land.

Watkins, who is both writer and performer, has constructed a charming and whimsical show. A smattering of audience participation keeps the crowd engaged and in hysterics, and his witty reimagining of Disney songs is endlessly entertaining (highlights include a recontextualised version of “Someday My Prince Will Come” that you’ll never forget). Behind the shimmer curtain lies an important message however. Gay identity is often shaped by what we see – if we don’t see ourselves, how can we learn to be ourselves?

Denholm Spurr’s direction, coupled with Simone Murphy’s choreography, ensure the silliness remains throughout, and Watkins really works hard here, responding well to audience heckles and good-spirited joining in. Watkins could be bolder with his singing (there’s a fantastic voice in there desperate to get out) and could trust his audience with the jokes more, but overall this is a frivolous, fun fairy tale that draws attention to a serious issue in LGBTQ+ representation whilst nevertheless making sure everyone, Disney fan or no, is thoroughly entertained.

 

Reviewed by Joseph Prestwich

 

Above The Stag Theatre

Happily Ever Poofter

Above the Stag until 2nd July as part of Edinburgh Festival Fringe preview tour

 

Previously reviewed at this venue:
Title Of Show | ★★★★ | February 2019
Goodbye Norma Jeane | ★★ | March 2019
Romance Romance | ★★★★ | March 2019
Queereteria TV | ★★ | April 2019
Fanny & Stella: The Shocking True Story  | ★★★★ | May 2019

 

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Riot Act

Riot Act
★★★★★

Arcola Theatre & UK Tour

Riot Act

Riot Act

Arcola Theatre

Reviewed – 16th June 2019

★★★★★

 

“Gregory remains an incredibly watchable and powerful figure on stage”

 

Just under a year since its mesmerising turn at the King’s Head Theatre, ‘Riot Act’ is on the move. The Arcola Theatre plays host this time for three performances that commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall riots, and the show will soon embark on a UK tour. I reviewed the show last year, and found it powerful, deeply moving and politically rousing. None of that has changed, and the show, along with writer and star Alexis Gregory, have only got better.

This is verbatim theatre utilising personal stories in the best way. Created from hours of interviews, we meet three gay men from three different generations: Michael, one of the last remaining witnesses to the Stonewall Riots; Lavinia, Hackney drag queen of the 70s; and Paul, Act Up activist and successful writer in his own right. These three stories come together to present a powerful collective experience. Struggles with identity and finding community. The freedom of gay liberation post-Stonewall. The unimaginable pain and suffering of the AIDS crisis. These oral histories give us tales beyond the mainstream. They ask us: what does it mean to be gay? What do we know about gay history? Do we take things for granted that in reality aren’t?

Paul’s message about “constant vigilance” seems even more potent in light of recent events. The cancelling of a performance of ‘Rotterdam’ in Southampton after stars Lucy Jane Parkinson and Rebecca Banatvala were pelted with stones. The headline grabbing attack on a London bus of Melania Geymonat and her girlfriend Chris. This show reminds us these aren’t random, but the continuation of a culture of intolerance we all know well. The question is: what can you do to change things?

Gregory remains an incredibly watchable and powerful figure on stage. He morphs effortlessly into the three characters using voice and stance to expertly delineate between them all. His speech rhythms also change – it’s real dedication to character on display here. Rikki Beadle-Blair directs, and the pair play around with lighting to create drama. Beadle-Blair allows Gregory to enjoy the comedic moments – and this audience was loving it. Laughter of surprise and recognition mixes in this vibrant and diverse audience. The show invites conversation. Speak to the person next to you! Ask them questions! Remember your shared history!

In all, ‘Riot Act’ remains one of the best queer shows I’ve seen in London. I’m so glad the rest of the UK will get chance to hear these stories and respond to them. How much are the metropolitan experiences of the men in the show shared by people from across the UK? What parallels will emerge? And what of the future of ‘Riot Act’? Gregory mentioned a ‘women’s riot act’ – so the future looks bright. Beautiful, engaging and moving, I recommend this show to everyone.

 

Reviewed by Joseph Prestwich

Photography by Dawson James

 


Riot Act

Arcola Theatre until 30th June then UK tour continues

 

Last ten shows reviewed at this venue:
The Rape of Lucretia | ★★★★ | July 2018
Elephant Steps | ★★★★ | August 2018
Greek | ★★★★ | August 2018
Forgotten | ★★★ | October 2018
Mrs Dalloway | ★★★★ | October 2018
A Hero of our Time | ★★★★★ | November 2018
Stop and Search | ★★ | January 2019
The Daughter-In-Law | ★★★★★ | January 2019
Little Miss Sunshine | ★★★★★ | April 2019
The Glass Menagerie | ★★★★ | May 2019

 

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