Tag Archives: Agatha Christie

The Mousetrap

★★★★

Theatre Royal Windsor & UK Tour

The Mousetrap

The Mousetrap

Theatre Royal Windsor

Reviewed – 21st October 2019

★★★★

 

“part of a great and uniquely British theatrical tradition”

 

Dame Agatha Christie was seemingly mystified by the astonishing success of her ‘Mousetrap’ which has long been the world’s longest running play. After 67 years of continuous performances, this entertaining murder mystery with a surprise twist continues to fill seats at St Martin’s Theatre in London. Just one official tour is allowed and it is currently in residence at the Theatre Royal Windsor until 26 October before continuing its national tour to May 2020.

The story concerns a young couple who open their manor house in Berkshire to the public as a guest house for the first time one freezing, snow-bound night when communications are cut and anything, even murder, might happen… It’s hard to imagine a radical new take on the piece. Perhaps set it in an Airbnb in a New York loft? It would never work. Like the magnificently upholstered classic that it is, this show gently purrs along, faithfully mirroring both the look and sound of the popular period West End show. The opulent and baronial set is there, as are the period costumes and cut-glass accents together with all the assumptions and prejudices of the post-war period.

A cast of eight assume the roles of the guest house’s proprietors (Nick Biadon and Harriet Hare) and their five guests (Susan Penhaligion, David Alcock, Lewis Chandler, John Griffiths and Saskia Vaigncourt-Strallen). Geoff Arnold is Sergeant Trotter. On the night I saw it, Susan Penhaligon (Upstairs Downstairs, Bergerac, Emmerdale) was indisposed and her role was confidently filled by her understudy, Judith Rae. She was nicely ratty as a crusty grande dame. Most of the guests are amusing character roles, with mannered performances that verge on caricature.

As the very camp Christopher Wren, Lewis Chandler had a laugh that seemed to be channelling Kenneth Williams, and made a big impact. David Alcock gave a nicely observed performance as a sinister Signor Paravicini, and there were other strong performances from Saskia Vaigncourt-Strallen and John Griffiths. Nick Biadon, Harriet Hare and Geoff Arnold give assured performances in their respective roles.

Dame Agatha herself said ‘it’s the kind of play you could take anyone to. It’s not really frightening. It’s not really horrible. It’s not really a farce, but it has a little bit of all these things and perhaps that satisfies a lot of different people’. Agatha Christie gave the rights to this most successful of plays to her grandson. In the spirit of giving back to the theatre world, Mousetrap Theatre Projects, the industry’s leading educational charity, is run by the current owner of the play’s rights.

This really is a play that keeps on giving. It offers a good night out and is part of a great and uniquely British theatrical tradition.

 

Reviewed by David Woodward

Photography by Johan Persson

 


The Mousetrap

Theatre Royal Windsor until 26th October then UK tour continues

 

Previously reviewed at this venue:
The Trials Of Oscar Wilde | ★★★★ | March 2019
Octopus Soup! | ★★½ | April 2019

 

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Towards Zero

★★★★★

The Mill at Sonning

Towards Zero

Towards Zero

The Mill at Sonning

Reviewed – 17th August 2019

★★★★★

 

“The script is delightfully playful and does not take itself too seriously”

 

Overlooking the banks of the River Thames, The Mill at Sonning is the UK’s only permanent dinner theatre. Wooden beams and a working water mill decorate the bar and restaurant and beautiful grounds surround this impressive venue. The theatre’s out-of-the-way location makes it the perfect backdrop for a murder mystery to unfold …

Towards Zero is a detective novel by the Queen of Crime Agatha Christie and is thus packed with suspense, atmosphere and unexpected twists and turns. Adapted for the theatre in 1956 by Gerald Verner, The Mill at Sonning’s production is no doubt aided by its director Brian Blessed’s friendship with Christie as a young actor at Nottingham Repertory Theatre.

The play is quintessential Christie. Elderly matriarch Lady Tressillian (Hildegard Neil) has invited her wards for their annual visit to her home at Gull’s Point. There is cause for celebration: Thomas Royde (Patrick Myles) has just returned from a seven-year stint overseas. However, Nevile Strange (Rob Heanley) creates tension by inviting both his ex-wife Audrey (Kate Tydman) and new wife Kay (Bethan Nash) to join him, the latter of whom retaliates by socialising with old flame Ted Latimer (Duncan Wilkins). The visit soon takes a horrifying turn when Lady Tressillian’s ill-treated dogsbody companion Mary Aldin (Rosalind Blessed) is found passed out and a dead body discovered soon after. With no possible motive, Superintendent Battle (George Telfer), his nephew Inspector Leach (Chris Pybus) and criminology enthusiast Matthew Treves (Noel White) must put their heads together to solve the most confusing of cases.

Each ticket includes a two-course meal in the restaurant before the show. The audience is spoiled for choice with a delicious main course buffet before the tantalising dessert is brought to the table. After a leisurely lunch, guests can wander around the grounds or enjoy a drink in the bar before showtime.

The theatre is surprisingly intimate, and the semi-round stage allows the audience to feel involved in the performance. The set (Dinah England) consists of an intricately designed living room with doors to the left and right of the stage. A raised platform and bay windows form the backdrop. Seating arrangements and a drinks trolley decorate the space. The lighting (Matthew Biss) and pale-coloured furniture are successful in making the room appear airy and that of a summer home. Lighting is also used well elsewhere to spotlight and cast suspicion on different characters.

The script is delightfully playful and does not take itself too seriously. There are some wonderfully self-referential moments within the production such as when Royde turns on the radio to list to a show entitled ‘Red Herring’ shortly after the audience sees an argument between two individuals. Royde also quips that the Edgar Wallace novel he is reading is ‘not as good as Christie’ much to the amusement of the audience. The costumes (Natalie Titchener) are pleasingly fitting with Nash’s poppy dress of particular note.

Neil is the standout star and commands the stage and her fellow actors. White comes into his element in the second half of the play and brilliantly describes the concept of ‘Zero Hour’ – the time of the murder which is a culmination of many different circumstances converging at one point – which underlines the play’s premise. Pybus is given most of the play’s most humorous lines and delivers them well.

The beautiful grounds, scrumptious pre-show lunch and wonderful theatre makes Blessed’s production of Towards Zero a winning combination. Visiting The Mill at Sonning is much more than just seeing a play, it is a unique experience and is a definite ‘must’ for every theatregoer.

 

Reviewed by Flora Doble

Photography by Andreas Lambis

 


Towards Zero

The Mill at Sonning until 28th September

 

Previous ten shows covered by this reviewer:
Starved | ★★★★★ | Bread & Roses Theatre | April 2019
Flinch | ★★★ | Old Red Lion Theatre | May 2019
Rejoicing At Her Wondrous Vulva The Young Woman Applauded Herself  | ★★★★★ | Ovalhouse | May 2019
East London Life Drawing: Cola Phalquero | ★★★★★ | h Club | June 2019
The Knot | ★★★★ | Old Red Lion Theatre | June 2019
Vulvarine | ★★★★★ | King’s Head Theatre | June 2019
50 Years Of LGBT/Pride Panel And Discussion | ★★★★ | h Club | July 2019
Have I Told You I’m Writing a Play About my Vagina? | ★★★★ | The Bunker | July 2019
The Falcon’s Malteser | ★★★★★ | The Vaults | July 2019
Type On Paper | ★★★★ | Tabard Theatre | July 2019

 

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