Tag Archives: Joanna Murray–Smith

Honour – 3 Stars

Honour

Honour

Park Theatre

Reviewed – 30th October 2018

★★★

“doesn’t use the opportunity of a revival to explore deeper the rage and disappointment bubbling under the script’s surface”

 

‘Honour’ is a topical and gripping four-hander that paints an honest portrait of middle-class life collapsing in on itself. Witty and erudite, Joanna Murray-Smith’s script, here revived after a successful National Theatre production in 2003, retains its relevance and is even enhanced playing now in a society were gender politics and the nature of relationships have moved firmly into the spotlight.

Henry Goodman plays George, an affable, “pretentiously casual” writer and intellectual being interviewed for a volume on ‘great minds’ by the ambitious and direct Claudia (Katie Brayben). Her presence in George’s life aggressively rocks the comfortable middle-class boat he and his writer wife Honour (Imogen Stubbs) have been cruising in for the last thirty-two years, and George’s decision to leave forces Honour, with the help of their daughter Sophie (Natalie Simpson), to re-evaluate what her life has become, and what it could have been.

Although familiar territory, Murray-Smith’s play asks some useful questions about resentment, guilt, passion, and above all love. How much should a person sacrifice for another? How much of our own lives do we give up out of a sense of duty to someone else’s? It pits careerism against relationships, a conflict particularly relevant in millennial circles and here a gentle reminder that it’s never too late for change.

The ensemble are convincing in their relationships and expertly play the insecurities, thought changes and verbal stop/starts that pepper the script. Stubbs and Goodman are riveting to watch and handle the emotional weight of their characters’ choices well. Sudden blackouts keep the audience on their toes, and Liz Cooke’s set, with its dilapidated blue wave looming over the course of events, foreshadows the story nicely but fails to ask any real questions of the script. The pastel blues of banal middle-class life are shocked into action by the blacks and reds of Claudia’s costume. Paul Robinson’s direction keeps things pacey and balanced, but again, doesn’t use the opportunity of a revival to explore deeper the rage and disappointment bubbling under the script’s surface.

Luckily, this is a gripping study of marriage with instantly relatable characters played by talented actors. It’s certainly a middle-class play about middle-class problems, but by playing it safe, misses out on directly challenging its seemingly middle-class audience itself. How much resentment, how much regret, do you carry around under the visage of well-to-do urban existence?

 

Reviewed by Joseph Prestwich

Photography by Alex Brenner

 


Honour

Park Theatre until 24th November

 

Previously reviewed at this venue:
There or Here | ★★★½ | January 2018
A Princess Undone | ★★★ | February 2018
Passage to India | ★★★ | February 2018
Vincent River | ★★★★ | March 2018
Pressure | ★★★★ | April 2018
Building the Wall | ★★★★ | May 2018
End of the Pier | ★★★★ | July 2018
The Rise & Fall of Little Voice | ★★★★ | August 2018
Distance | ★★★★ | September 2018
The Other Place | ★★★ | September 2018

 

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Songs For Nobodies – 4 Stars

Nobodies

Songs For Nobodies

Wilton’s Music Hall

Reviewed – 26th March 2018

★★★★

“such a talented actor giving an exceptional performance”

 

This highly recommended production gives two compelling reasons for a theatre visit. Firstly it provides the rare opportunity to see and hear the terrifically talented Australian Bernadette Robinson in this country and secondly to do so at one of the few surviving grand music halls in the world.

This was my first visit to Wilton’s Music Hall though it certainly won’t be my last. Tucked behind a row of terrace properties in Whitechapel, a short walk away from Tower Hill, this building has undergone a sympathetic restoration process over recent years. Entering the venue there is a sense of awe, a feeling of visiting the past which enhances the anticipation of watching the performance.

Once inside the musical hall there was an angled apron stage on which Robinson performed. This area included several items of furniture that she used to extend the visual aspects of the stories she portrayed. Behind her was a three piece band that was positioned on the raised stage, framed by a magnificent proscenium arch. The stage and her clothing were exclusively black.

Songs for Nobodies was written by Joanna Murray-Smith to specifically showcase Robinson’s exceptional vocal talents and her ability to recreate the sounds of legendary female singers. In this one woman show there are five separate monologues which involve singers from entirely different musical worlds. In each she plays both the megastar and the ‘nobody’ whose life is changed in some way by their interaction with one of those great singers.

We first get to meet Bea, a washroom attendant who meets Judy Garland on the night of her famous Carnegie Hall concert in 1961. Her performance of Come Rain or Come Shine sent a shiver down my spine. Next is Pearl, an usherette in Kansas City, who meets Country and Western star Patsy Cline in her dressing room on the night that thirty year old Patsy was killed in a plane crash. She sings two songs including Crazy and the portrayal of her emotionally expressive and bold contralto voice is perfect. The third monologue is both funny and sad. It tells the story of an English librarian whose father was helped by Edith Piaf to escape from a prisoner of war camp. Piaf’s voice is perfectly recreated and of the two songs performed Non, Je ne Regrette Rien is a showstopper.

Billie Holiday has an immediately recognisable voice. Inspired by jazz instrumentalists it was one that pioneered a new way of improvisation, phrasing and tempo. Again Robinson is able to master this in the story of budding journalist Too Junior Jones. Here the ‘nobody’ is a woman of privilege who meets the wonderful singer and acknowledges the obstacles she faced. In this segment there are three songs including Strange Fruit. The final monologue demonstrates perfectly the voice range that Robinson has. We are treated to a stunning version of Puccini’s Vissi D’Arte where years of her studying classical singing are obvious. It is a great story of an Irish nanny for Ari Onassis and his relationship with perhaps the greatest diva of all – Maria Callas.

The audience reaction to the show was an immediate and thoroughly deserved standing ovation. Bernadette Robinson is clearly the star of the show but the overall enjoyment is enhanced by the support she receives when on stage. The three piece backing band is set in the background and never attempts to upstage the singer. There is some remarkable lighting from Malcolm Rippeth who manages to both spotlight and flood the stage superbly. Designer Justin Nardella brings a black understated style to the stage and Justin Teasdale with Tony Gayle produce a perfect sound design in what could be a difficult acoustic hall. Simon Philips directs the show expertly ensuring the audience is never in doubt as to who the star of the show is.

I left the theatre feeling privileged to have witnessed such a talented actor giving an exceptional performance in a wonderful theatre environment. It was a real highlight of my 2018 theatrical year so far. I loved it!

 

Reviewed by Steve Sparrow

Photography by Nicholas Brittain

 


Songs For Nobodies

Wilton’s Music Hall until 7th April

 

 

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