Tag Archives: Miranda Foster

All’s Well That Ends Well

★★★★

Jermyn Street Theatre

All’s Well That Ends Well

All’s Well That Ends Well

Jermyn Street Theatre

Reviewed – 8th November 2019

★★★★

 

“Ceri-Lyn Cissone steals the comedic limelight with her natural gift and assorted accents”

 

“All’s Well That Ends Well” has always been one of Shakespeare’s least performed works. Classified as one of his ‘problem plays’ it shifts between comedy, fantasy and psychological drama. The evidence that Shakespeare intended it to be a comedy is in the happy ending, as the title would suggest. Criticised as being a rather contrived and truncated conclusion, Tom Littler’s inventive production at the Jermyn Street Theatre adds a subtle twist that instils a touch of much needed pathos.

The action is transposed to 1970s London, Paris and Florence. When his Bertram’s father dies, he rejects his friends, abandons his mother, and flees his childhood home. But the orphaned Helena, in love with him since childhood, refuses to give up hope. Following in her father’s footsteps, she becomes a doctor, saves a monarch’s life, and crosses half of Europe in the passionate pursuit of her happiness.

This is an intimate production, scaled down to a cast of six. The setting is evoked more by the soundtrack than Neil Irish and Anett Black’s slightly baffling set design. Predominated by Fleetwood Mac’s ‘Rumours’ album from the mid seventies, the music is intercut with live piano accompaniment – a leitmotif echoing the iconic riffs of the recorded music. Stefan Bednarczyk and Ceri-Lyn Cissone duet and duel on a pair of upright pianos, seamlessly weaving in and out of the action. Bednarczyk’s arrangements underscore not just the dialogue but the emotional core of the characters that is often lost in the delivery.

The crux is persuading the audience why Helena should be so in love with the outwardly unloveable Bertram. Gavin Fowler shows us a chink in the armour of his roguish indifference to Helena that sheds a ray of hope. We’re not sure that Helena sees this, but her dogged determination to bag her man is matched by Hannah Morrish’s solid performance. Multi-rolling Miranda Foster delivers the most emotional punch as Helena’s newly widowed mother and the ailing Queen (normally a king) of France. Cured from her illness by Helena, Foster is like a starry-eyed convert before reclaiming her steely grasp on the proceedings.

But all in all, much of the musicality of Shakespeare’s language is missing, and the rhythm often fails to ignite the frequent tongue-twisters and tricks of the dialogue. The plot is slight so it’s all in the text which doesn’t always match the magic created by the musical atmosphere.

But what does shine is the comedy, and the torchbearers are the peripheral characters. Robert Mountford’s swaggering Parolles is a gust of fresh air as he relishes his cowardly downfall, while Ceri-Lyn Cissone steals the comedic limelight with her natural gift and assorted accents.

With themes of social mobility, deception and sexual misconduct that are still relevant today, this is a play that mixes dark fairytale with light humour; but, despite moments of magic, the peaks and troughs are never fully reached.

 

Reviewed by Jonathan Evans

Photography by Matt Pereira

 


All’s Well That Ends Well

Jermyn Street Theatre until 30th November 2019

 

Last ten shows reviewed at this venue:
Agnes Colander: An Attempt At Life | ★★★★ | February 2019
Mary’s Babies | ★★★ | March 2019
Creditors | ★★★★ | April 2019
Miss Julie | ★★★ | April 2019
Pictures Of Dorian Gray (A) | ★★★ | June 2019
Pictures Of Dorian Gray (B) | ★★★ | June 2019
Pictures Of Dorian Gray (C) | ★★★★ | June 2019
Pictures Of Dorian Gray (D) | ★★ | June 2019
For Services Rendered | ★★★★★ | September 2019
The Ice Cream Boys | ★★★★ | October 2019

 

Click here to see our most recent reviews

 

Tonight at 8.30 – 5 Stars

Tonight

Tonight at 8.30

Jermyn Street Theatre

Reviewed – 21st April 2018

★★★★★

“the entire production company have done an absolutely incredible job of performing over seven hours of wonderful theatre”

 

Bedroom Farces is the first instalment of Noël Coward’s ‘Tonight at 8:30’, a series of nine plays performed over the course of the day at the Jermyn Street Theatre. Using a cast of only nine performers, the series of plays is a tough task to undertake, especially when working with a script written by such a well renowned playwright. Director Tom Littler does a great job of keeping the audience engaged throughout the first two hour fifteen minute instalment, leaving them waiting excitedly for the next two.

We Were Dancing is the first performance, and it achieves roars of laughter from the audience. The cast work incredibly well together, their comic timing impeccable. Set on the veranda of a country club in the 1930s, it documents a married woman and divorced man falling in, and quickly out, of love. Included is a song, which seems to lack the polish and professionalism of the rest of the play. The singing and dancing somewhat falls short of the incredible acting of the rest of the performance, however this does not remove from a hilarious and entertaining play.

Ways and Means (main picture) follows and is by far the best performance of the trio. Miranda Foster and Toby Cartwright play a penniless couple who are desperate to get their hands on money in any way they can. Forster and Cartwright work beautifully together, expertly presenting the couple and their wavering marriage. Set in one bedroom, with only a dresser and bed for set, Ways and Means is thoroughly entertaining, and you find yourself completely rooting for the couple as they attempt to figure out a solution to their problem.

Slightly more whimsical is Shadow Play. Incorporating elements of physical theatre, song and dance, it follows the dreams of Victoria Gayforth (Sara Crowe) after she learns her husband wants a divorce and takes one too many sleeping pills. They revisit the night they met, and the play is doused in a feeling of nostalgia and a need to know what went wrong. The dancing and singing were once again not quite up to the standard of the rest of the play, and the turbulent dream can be somewhat hard to follow, but the play provides a neat ending to Bedroom Farces.

Tonight

Nuclear Families was the second instalment of Coward’s Tonight at 8:30, and included the majority of the cast in every play, showcasing each of their acting abilities in a multitude of different characters. The set in this series of performances was also incredibly detailed and worked perfectly. Family Album was the first play in this segment, a very short, simple, one room performance that shows a large family in mourning after their father had died. This play was heavily song based, but Rosemary Ashe and Jeremy Rose performed beautifully together, and the ensemble moments were also resonant and harmonious, a vast improvement on this element in Bedroom Farces.

Hands Across the Sea is a slightly more confusing and elongated play which did cause a slight lapse in the middle of Nuclear Families. Set in the drawing room of a wealthy couple’s flat as they have multiple visitors and get very confused over who is who, the plot doesn’t quite feel like it’s going anywhere. There are some hilarious moments, and once again the actors’ comic timing is perfect. Especially notable are Miranda Forster and Stefan Bednardczyk, who play the couple that own the flat, and Rosemary Ashe, who plays their loud and amusing friend.

The play that most stands out in this section, however, is An Astonished Heart (picture above). Much more serious and melancholy than the other plays, it steals the show as the most captivating and thought-provoking performance. The play documents the life of a psychiatrist, played by Nick Waring, after he has an affair and falls desperately in love with his mistress. Waring is incredible, and perfectly suited to this part. After showcasing his comedic skills in the previous plays, he really comes into his own in this performance. You really believe his slow decline at the hands of his wife and lover, sympathising with him even though he is in the wrong. Miranda Forster once again puts in an incredible performance as the wife, perfectly characterising her complicated character. An Astonished Heart was the perfect end to Nuclear Families, and strongly resonated with the audience even hours after leaving the theatre.

Tonight

The final portion of the day was Secret Hearts which includes what is perhaps Coward’s most well-known play, Still Life (picture above). The first play in this instalment, Star Chamber, is one which has not been performed since 1936, and it was somewhat apparent as to why. The play lacked the energy and excitement of the rest of the collection, following a group of theatre committee members as they attempt to have a meeting. Like Hands Across the Sea, this play felt like a lapse in comparison to the others in this instalment, missing the comedy and enticement of the rest. It did give the cast the opportunity to once again embrace new characters, and each was well-developed and unique, somewhat carrying the otherwise tedious play.

Red Peppers followed Star Chamber, finally regaining the momentum and hilarity of the rest of the day. This short play follows a comedy duo, the Red Peppers, after they mess up their act and have to deal with the consequences backstage. Duo Rosemary Ashe and Jeremy Rose once again stole the show, their characters perfectly developed, their comic timing pristine and their voices perfectly complimenting each other. Their dance routines were of slightly lower quality, but considering the fact that they had been performing for almost six hours at this point over the course of the day, and the sheer amount of material that each cast member had to learn, this is very much forgivable. This was possibly the funniest of the nine plays and was well suited as the penultimate play before Still Life.

The much anticipated Still Life was the final performance of the day. After Laura, played by Miranda Forster, happens to meet Alec, played by Nick Waring, at a train station refreshment room, their chance encounter starts a tumultuous affair which can only ever end in heartbreak. Every cast member really came into their own in this final performance, fuelled by Coward’s faultless script. Whilst a few things did go wrong, including multiple cakes and a jug of milk ending up on the floor, this didn’t remove from the tension built by the main storyline. This play strikes the perfect balance between comedy and tragedy, ending the entire day on a bitter-sweet note.

Tonight at 8:30 was a long but rewarding day spent at the Jermyn Street Theatre. Whilst some of the plays did lapse over the course of the day, the entire production company have done an absolutely incredible job of performing over seven hours of wonderful theatre over the course of the day. Each instalment has its merits, and it is impossible to judge which one to hold in the highest regard. Every cast member showcases an incredible talent, playing nine completely different characters over the course of the day. Tom Littler did a fantastic job directing nine very different plays and managing to keep the audience fully entertained throughout. Special mention also has to go to Stefan Bednardczyk, who not only performed as an actor but also as pianist throughout the day. Tonight at 8:30 was definitely an ambitious, but amazingly accomplished series of plays which is definitely worth spending an entire day to experience.

Reviewed by Charlotte Cox

Photography by Robert Workman (Bedroom Farces and Secret Hearts) and David Monteith-Hodge (Nuclear Families)

 


Tonight at 8.30

Jermyn Street Theatre until 20th May

 

 

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